About Cyclospora

From the nation’s leading law firm representing victims of Cyclospora and other foodborne illness outbreaks.

Chapter 5

How is Cyclospora Diagnosed?

Cyclosporiasis is usually diagnosed symptomatically in clinical settings, including the presence of watery diarrhea, abdominal cramping, and bloating. In untreated, immunocompetent people, the diarrhea can last from days to weeks to a month or more and can wax and wane, with variable oocyst shedding. Oocysts can continue to be shed (intermittently or continuously) by non-symptomatic people, and symptoms can also persist in the absence of oocysts in feces. In a clinical context, conventional diagnosis usually involves microscopic examination of intestinal tissue biopsy sections, stool samples for the presence of developmental stages of Cyclospora, or advanced molecular testing for DNA. Improved specificity and sensitivity have been possible largely through the use of PCR (polymerase chain reaction), which enables the specific amplification of genetic loci from tiny amounts of genomic DNA of Cyclospora. Because of the intermittent nature of oocyst shedding and the low numbers of this stage in feces, it is recommended that multiple stool samples be collected at 2-3 day intervals over a period of more than a week, to increase the likelihood of identifying the disease microscopically.

Cyclospora under the microscope


Previous Chapter

Symptoms of Cyclospora Infection

Next Chapter

Cyclosporiasis Treatment

Related Blog Articles

The Cyclospora blog supplements this Marler Clark website About Cyclospora | Subscribe

Connect with Marler Clark

Office:

1012 First Avenue
Fifth Floor
Seattle, WA 98104

Hours:

M-F, 8:30 am - 5:00 pm, Pacific

Call toll free:

1 (800) 884-9840

If you have questions about foodborne illness, your rights or the legal process, we’d be happy to answer them for you.